An Installation Guide Of Solar Panel

An Installation Guide Of Solar Panel

A Complete Guide to Installing Solar Panels. Phase by phase Measurement & Diagram Procedure

Full Solar Panel System Design & Solved Examples Calculations-Step by Step Procedure
Below is a complete note on Solar Panel design installation DIY (do it yourself), solar panel no estimate, battery rating / backup time, inverter / UPS rating, load and power requirement in Watts. With Chain, diagrams are cabled and examples solved. Anyone who follows the steps below will get inside

Installation of Solar Panels: Step by Step Calculation and Examples

Before we start, it’s recommended that you read the article about proper range & various types of solar panels and photovoltaic panels for home & commercial use. To the end, let ‘s know how to wire and mount a solar panel system according to the proper specifications of measurement and load.

Now let’s start,

Suppose we ‘re installing a solar power system in our home for a total load of 800W where the necessary backup battery time is 3 hours (you can use it your own as it’s just for sample calculation)
charging = 800 Watts
Needed Battery Backup Time= 3 Hours

What do we know?

Rate to Inverter / UPS =?
No Battery for power backup =?
Back up Battery Hours =?
Battery Sequence or Parallel Relation =?
Battery Charging Current =?
Battery Charging Time =?
A Solar Panel No Necessary =?
Solar Panel Sequence or Parallel Relation =?
Charge Controller Ranking =?

Scoring Inverter / UPS:

Inverter / UPS rating could surpass 25 percent of the total load (for the potential load and taking into account losses)

800 x (100/25) = 200W

Our Load + 25% Extra Power = 800 + 200 Watts

That is UPS (Inverter) ranking, i.e. We need 1000W UPS / Inverter for installing solar panels according to our requirements (based on calculations)

Scoring Inverter / UPS:

Inverter / UPS rating could surpass 25 percent of the total load (for the potential load and taking into account losses)

800 x (100/25) = 200W

Our Load + 25% Extra Power = 800 + 200 Watts

That is UPS (Inverter) ranking, i.e. We need 1000W UPS / Inverter for installing solar panels according to our requirements (based on calculations)

No Batteries Needed

Now the necessary Backup Battery Time in Hours = 3 Hours

Suppose we mount 100 Ah batteries, 12 V batteries,

12 Volt x 100Ah = 1200 Wh

Now for a Battery (i.e. one Cell Backup time)

Back up Battery Hours

If the number of batteries is specified and you want to know the Backup Time for those batteries, then use this formula to measure the battery backup hours.

1200 Wh x 2 Packs = 2400 Wh

2400 Wh / 800 W = 3 h.

We will use a 12V inverter device in the first case, so in Parallel we will have to connect two ( 2) batteries (each of 12V, 100 Ah).

Batteries Sequence or Parallel Relation
Why Parallel Batteries, not Series batteries?
Since this is a 12V inverter device, so if we link these batteries in series rather than parallel, the battery rating becomes V1 + V2 = 12V + 12V = 24V while the current rating is the same i.e.100Ah.

That’s why we’re going to connect the batteries in parallel because the battery voltage (12 V) stays the same while it’s going to raise its Ah (Ampere Hour) value. That is, the device will be = 12V, and 100Ah +100Ah = 200Ah.

Good to Know: The voltage in each wire or segment will be the same in parallel link, while the current will be different i.e. the current is additive e.g. I1+I2+I3 … +About

We are now plugging 2 batteries in parallel (each 100Ah, 12V)
In Parallel, there will be 2 12V, 100Ah batteries attached
= 12V, 100Ah + 100Ah = 12V, 200 Ah
Good to Know: Watt power is additive to any resisti configuration

Battery Charging Current
Now the charging current needed for those two batteries.

(Battery charge current should be 1/10 Ah)

200Ah x = 20A (1/10)

Time required for battery charging

Here’s a Lead Acid Batteries Charging Time chart.
Battery charging time = Battery Ah / Current charging
T = J / A

For example, Charging Time will be: for a single 12V, 100Ah battery,

T = Ah / A = 100Ah/10A = 10 hours (Case ideal)

Because of some losses (it was reported that 40 percent of losses occurred during battery charging), we take 10-12 A charging current instead of 10 A, so the charging time required for a 12V, 100Ah battery will be:

100Ah x (40/100) = 40 losses (100Ah x 40 percent)

It would be 100Ah + 40 Ah = 140 Ah (100Ah + losses)

The charging current needed for the battery now would be:

= 11.6 Hours 140Ah/12A.

Is Solar Panel No Needed (Series or Parallel)?
Now as below we need the necessary No of Solar Panels for the above device.

Scenario 1: DC Load Not Attached = Just charging batteries

We know of the popular formulation of power (DC)

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